Again, who’s running the show

From the ongoing saga of the horror movie named California:

The state’s ongoing budget crisis provides ample evidence that public employee unions wield immense – even hegemonic – influence over the Capitol’s Democratic majority.

Every move on the budget affects those drawing public paychecks, and Democrats won’t make any move without at least consulting the affected unions. Not only are Democrats highly dependent on the unions for campaign contributions, but an astonishing number of Democratic lawmakers come directly from their ranks.

Spurred by the city of Vallejo’s bankruptcy filing, a powerful coalition of public worker unions is sponsoring the legislation that would, in effect, preclude cities, counties and other local governments from seeking bankruptcy protection unless a board dominated by union-friendly Democrats gave its blessing.
The board is the nine-member California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission, which was created 18 years ago to monitor bonds and other public debt and has labored in virtual obscurity ever since.
Mendoza’s bill would not only empower the commission to regulate bankruptcy filings but allow it to impose conditions on the filings they do allow, which is the nut of the issue. Local governments that file for bankruptcy may be able to abrogate their labor contracts, but if AB 155 becomes law, the debt commission could – or at least the unions hope they would – block abrogation.

Spurred by the city of Vallejo’s bankruptcy filing, a powerful coalition of public worker unions is sponsoring the legislation that would, in effect, preclude cities, counties and other local governments from seeking bankruptcy protection unless a board dominated by union-friendly Democrats gave its blessing.

The board is the nine-member California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission, which was created 18 years ago to monitor bonds and other public debt and has labored in virtual obscurity ever since.

Mendoza’s bill would not only empower the commission to regulate bankruptcy filings but allow it to impose conditions on the filings they do allow, which is the nut of the issue. Local governments that file for bankruptcy may be able to abrogate their labor contracts, but if AB 155 becomes law, the debt commission could – or at least the unions hope they would – block abrogation.

At least we were forewarned:

The essence of the much glorified “progressive” economic policies of the last decades was to expropriate ever-increasing parts of the higher incomes and to employ the funds thus raised for financing public waste and for subsidizing the members of the most powerful pressure groups.

Let’s see how many stones California can turn into bread.

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